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Hi guys,
These are the materials I found for our perception of beauty topic:

1.Their ideas of beauty are, on the whole, the same as ours": Consistency and variability in the cross-cultural perception of female physical attractiveness.
Cunningham, Michael R.; Roberts, Alan R.; Barbee, Anita P.; Druen, Perri B.; Wu, Cheng-Huan. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology68.2 (Feb 1995): 261-279.
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The consistency of physical attractiveness ratings across cultural groups was examined. In Study 1, recently arrived native Asian and Hispanic students and White Americans rated the attractiveness of Asian, Hispanic, Black, and White photographed women. The mean correlation between groups in attractiveness ratings was r = .93. Asians, Hispanics, and Whites were equally influenced by many facial features, but Asians were less influenced by some sexual maturity and expressive features. In Study 2, Taiwanese attractiveness ratings correlated with prior Asian, Hispanic, and American ratings, mean r = .91. Supporting Study 1, the Taiwanese also were less positively influenced by certain sexual maturity and expressive features. Exposure to Western media did not influence attractiveness ratings in either study. In Study 3, Black and White American men rated the attractiveness of Black female facial photos and body types. Mean facial attractiveness ratings were highly correlated ( r = .94), but as predicted Blacks and Whites varied in judging bodies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)

2.Ratings of facial beauty by Asian-American and Caucasian females.
Wagatsuma, Erica; Kleinke, Chris L.. The Journal of Social Psychology109.2 (Dec 1979): 299-300.
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In 2 studies, a total of 60 Caucasian and 10 Asian-American female undergraduates were asked to rate the importance of various facial features (e.g., hair color, feature size) tobeauty in males and females. In general, finer features were seen as more important for (a) Caucasian females than Caucasian males and (b) Asian-American than Caucasian females. (2 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)

3. Age, sex, race, and the perception of facial beauty.
Cross, John F.; Cross, Jane. Developmental Psychology5.3 (Nov 1971): 433-439.
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Studied the preference judgments of 300 ss of both sexes and 2 races at 4 age levels from 7 yr. To adult for 72 portrait photographs of persons of 3 similar age levels and ofboth sexes and races. Ss rated the perceived beauty of the preferred faces on a 7-point scale. Age, sex, and race of judge and of face were analyzed to identify sources ofvariation in the ratings. Age of judge effects and their interactions were not significant. Females down-rated adult male faces. Blacks gave higher ratings than whites, with white males down-rating females and white females down-rating males. Female faces and adolescent faces received higher ratings than other sex and age groups. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)

4.
Putting beauty back in the eye of the beholder.

Little, Anthony C.; Perrett, David I.. The Psychologist15.1 (Jan 2002): 28-32.
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Asks the question: What makes a face beautiful? The authors note that although there is a belief that ' beauty is in the eye of the beholder ', facial attractiveness research has found a high degree of agreement both within and across cultures regarding which faces are attractive and not attractive. These studies suggest that people everywhere are usingthe same, or at least similar, criteria in their judgements of attractiveness. The authors discuss evolutionary theories of attractiveness, looking particularly at universal preferences for facial symmetry and the proposed evolutionary root of this phenomenon.The authors then examine factors that may lead to individual differences in theperception of facial attractiveness, and they speculate on how such differences may arise from learning and differences in life history. Attraction to similar and physically-similar partners ('look-alikes'), attraction to parental traits, the attractiveness of the beholder , and within-individual changes in attractiveness judgements are examined as factors which may affect both animal and human mate choice. It is concluded that individual differencesin preferences can be consistent with evolutionary theory. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)

5. Beauty and ugliness.
Wilde, Norman. Psychological Review5.1 (Jan 1898): 103-104.
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Discusses the article Beauty and Ugliness by Vernon Lee and C. Anstruther-Thompson (The Contemporary Review, Vol. LXXII, pp. 544-569). In this article we have a new theory of the perception of form, and of our aesthetic pleasure in formal beauty . The explanation is based upon the James-Lange theory of emotion as the conscious correlate of certain physical changes, ordinarily considered its expression. The purpose of the authors is to show that the perception of form takes place by means of organic processes connected with respiration and equilibrium, and that those forms are aesthetic which further these processes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)

By Oanh Kim Trinh

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